In our culture, it is customary to speak of the absolute value of the individual. We are very much concerned with “being true to ourselves,” and if unfortunate circumstances should prevent an individual from achieving “true potential,” we regard this as a tragedy and a waste. Thus we consider the discovery and achievement of one’s “true” self to be a fundamental project of existence. “You must become who you are!” “You must try to be yourself!” This does not mean that the individual must simply follow an appropriate path in life, but that the individual must live a life that testifies to the unique and unrepeatable character of his or her own existence. Negatively, it is sometimes said that our culture is informed by an extreme individualism, such that any duties that we do have to the community are regarded as necessary evils that ultimately protect our own selfish goals. More positively, however, this means that there is at least a “discourse” of human rights and some concern for individual liberty as the necessary condition for any individual fulfillment.

It is important to remember, though, that not every culture has valued the individual in this way or even distinguished the individual as such from the role or place in life that the individual happens to occupy. Perhaps we are encouraged to think of the value of the individual as if it were an absolute; but it would be more correct to say that concern for the individual has a definite history and appears at a particular period of time. In most “primitive” societies, which are bound by ritual and the recurrent rhythms of nature, an individual’s place is effectively marked out in advance . . .
Richard J. White, Nietzsche and the Problem of Sovereignty.
. . . and the ending of the journey cannot be averted.
Boris Pasternak, Dr. Zhivago (Excerpt from “Hamlet”).
To stand in opposition, or outside of the social order, is literally unthinkable.
Richard J. White, Nietzsche and the Problem of Sovereignty.
Most people, despite occasional protestations to the contrary, feel happier in a humdrum sort of existence, one that has relatively small oscillations of excitement; it helps them to fulfill their societal functions with a minimum of upset, and it also provides at least half-way protection against traumatic injury.
K.R. Eissler, Discourse on Hamlet and HAMLET.
To the questions:
Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace.
Who is it, that at the beginning of his maturity, feels drawn toward the great adventure (which always contains the possibility of shattering defeat), toward that insatiable search for the truth that may in the end result in involuntary isolation from the community? Who, one may ask in a general way, wants to make full use of his liberty?
K.R. Eissler, Discourse on Hamlet and HAMLET.
Listen:
Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace.
Who is willing to become aware of the hypocrisy that is rampant within himself and also at the very basis of society in which he lives, in the Church to which he belongs no less than in his profession?
K.R. Eissler, Discourse on Hamlet and HAMLET.

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https://dailstrug.wordpress.com/2015/01/30/id-rather-win-a-literary-prize/

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