Bernstein embarks on an extended discussion of Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde at 59:35 on the video.  What I find interesting is that Bernstein opens the lecture with a discussion of a world-wide military alert called by President Nixon in the wake of the Yom Kippur War in October 1973, contemporaneous with Bernstein’s Harvard Lecture.

Note that August 6 (see below) is the anniversary of the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima.  Bernstein’s Harvard Lecture may have been the source of my inspiration to combine the idea of nuclear conflagration with Tristan und Isolde.

On the afternoon of August 6, . . .
Martin Gregor-Dellin, Richard Wagner: His Life, His Work, His Century.
Or, maybe, . . .
Albert Camus, The Stranger.
. . . it was the 5th . . .
Alexandre Dumas, The Count of Monte Cristo.
. . . I can’t be sure. . . .
Albert Camus, The Stranger.
. . . Wagner summoned . . .
Martin Gregor-Dellin, Richard Wagner: His Life, His Work, His Century.
. . . a young musician . . .
Hugo Wolf, Letter to His Parents in Romain Rolland, Hugo Wolf.
. . . to his hotel room and invited him to look through the score of Tristan. It was almost finished.
Martin Gregor-Dellin, Richard Wagner: His Life, His Work, His Century.

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