To Case Manager:

I saw my therapist this afternoon at PIW, [redacted]. Mr. [redacted] would like Nurse [redacted] to call him. His number is [redacted].

And no, I have made no progress in the last 25 years. I still believe I am being stalked. I still believe people gang up on me. I still believe I can read hidden hostile signals in what others say. When I tell an employer these things, no employer will want to hire me. I have a right to reasonable accommodation. Even Voc Rehab said I have a right to tell a prospective employer about these issues.

If I go on job interviews it will only end up embarrassing McClendon. Employers will ask, “Who certified this guy for employment? He is severely disturbed.” Then there’s the issue of legal exposure. If I were to commit an act of violence in the workplace (which my history indicates is possible) McClendon could end up being sued because it was McClendon who said I was employable. That’s something to think about.

Gary Freedman
202 362 7064

To Gary Freedman:

Your last employment was over 25 years ago, I would like to think you have made some progress since then and feel you are able to work . You may not be able to go back into you previous field or work full time, but I think Voc Rehab will be able to assist you with exploring possible employment options.

From Case Manager

To Case Manager:

I am sending along in Attachment I the DC Court of Appeals decision that found that I was not employable at my last job.

Attachment II is a collection of the narrative portions of my job evaluations on my last job. Mr. [redacted] said I was industrious. That’s what my last employer said, that I was very industrious. That industriousness did not prevent the employer from finding that I was not employable by reason of severe mental illness. Obviously, “industriousness” is irrelevant to employability.

Gary Freedman
202 362 7064

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