“Please tell me why I am being fired from my position. I was a full professor at the University of Toronto when you offered me this job, and I gave up a tenured faculty position to accept it. You and Muriel . . .
J. Moussaieff Masson, Final Analysis.
. . . Muriel Gardiner, a Vienna-trained psychoanalyst . . .
Ralph Blumenthal, Did Freud’s Isolation Lead Him to Reverse Theory on Neurosis?
. . . you both . . .
William Shakespeare, Pericles, Prince of Tyre.
. . . assured me it was for life. I have a . . .
J. Moussaieff Masson, Final Analysis.
. . . wife and daughter . . .
T.S. Eliot, Marina (editor’s note).
. . . a family I must provide for. Had I known this was just a trial period or that I needed to espouse the conventional views I never would have accepted the position.”
J. Moussaieff Masson, Final Analysis.
I am speaking to you now like a man with a rope round his neck. What do you imagine I am? A being in revolt? No.
Joseph Conrad, Under Western Eyes.
” . . . My name and reputation is involved, the memory I shall leave behind here. . . . I am not here to salvage something for myself, or even to win the Board’s approval for my action. I counted on being regarded by my colleagues henceforth as a dubious phenomenon, and am prepared for that. But I don’t want to be regarded as a traitor or madman; that is a verdict I cannot accept. I have done something you must disapprove of, but I have done it because I had to, because it was incumbent upon me, because that is my destiny, which I believe in and which I assume with good will. If you cannot concede this much, then I have been defeated and have spoken with you in vain.”
Hermann Hesse, Magister Ludi: The Glass Bead Game.
Eissler was calmer now, and he said . . .
J. Moussaieff Masson, Final Analysis.
. . . clearly and to the point . . .
The New Cassell’s German Dictionary (entry for the German word “rein”).
. . . that all that was true, and he would now tell me why I had to be fired. I was being fired for three reasons. “The first is the article that appeared in the New York Times. The second reason is the Zeplichal incident. Do you remember, Professor Masson? In one of the Silberstein letters, Freud told his friend that he was sending him a book by Zeplichal. I asked you to find out who this person was. You looked it up and said apparently he had written a book on geometry. But you were wrong, Professor Masson. The Zeplichal Freud had in mind had written a book on shorthand, not geometry.” Here he paused to look up at me. Eissler was serious and apparently considered this almost a sin.
J. Moussaieff Masson, Final Analysis.
I was too stunned to respond.
George Stephanopoulos, All Too Human: A Political Education.
“The third and last reason you are being fired is that you told Anna Freud that a letter published in German from Freud to Karl Kraus contained nine transcription errors. But in fact you were wrong. There were only six errors, not nine.” Again, he looked absolutely indignant.
J. Moussaieff Masson, Final Analysis.
The power of . . .
Gabriel Garcia Marquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude.
. . . Eissler’s . . .
J. Moussaieff Masson, Final Analysis.
. . . presence was such that . . .
Gabriel Garcia Marquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude.
.
. . it was not necessary to demonstrate facts: it was enough . . .
Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Living to Tell the Tale.
.
. . for him . . .
Gabriel Garcia Marquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude.
. . . to have said . . .
L. Frank Baum, The Scarecrow of Oz.
. . . something for it to be true, with no proofs other than the power of his talent and the authority of his voice.
Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Living to Tell the Tale.

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