How decent of so great a personage to be so human with . . .
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust.
. . . a burning amateur, . . .
William Golding, Free Fall.
. . . like me.
L. Frank Baum, The Wizard of Oz.
The communication was brief . . .
Thomas Hardy, Jude the Obscure.
. . . (not worth mentioning), but the memory remained—I knew at that moment that I would never forget it and simultaneously I knew or thought I knew . . .
Franz Kafka, Letters to Milena.
. . . what the others, . . .
Franz Kafka, The Metamorphosis.
. . . the rest of the tribe . . .
Jack London, To The Man on the Trail.
. . . would say.
Edith Nesbit, The Story of the Treasure Seekers.
I dashed to the library at the first opportunity;
Primo Levi, The Periodic Table.
Once there, . . .
Booker T. Washington, Up From Slavery.
. . . I turned with respect to . . .
Primo Levi, The Periodic Table.
. . . Hermann Levi—
Peter Gay, Freud, Jews, and Other Germans.
Levi, . . .
Primo Levi, The Periodic Table.
. . . who was by no means free of vanity or unaware of his own position, . . .
Herbert Kupferberg, The Mendelssohns: Three Generations of Genius.
. . . that is, as . . .
Aldous Huxley, Crome Yellow.
. . . a Jew in a gentile world, . . .
Peter Gay, Freud, Jews, and Other Germans.
. . . looked at me with an amused, vaguely ironic expression:
Primo Levi, The Periodic Table.
. . . ambivalent at its heart.
Peter Gay, Freud, Jews, and Other Germans.
He said:
Genesis.
“We come from a strange tribe, you and I.”
Adam Gopnik, Hemingway, The Sensualist.
I looked at him quizzically.
Marianne Lile, Stepmother: A Memoir.
And he said,
Genesis.
My friend, you . . .
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust.
. . . could throw away . . .
Peter Gay, Freud: A Life for Our Time quoting Sigmund Freud, Letter to His Fiancée.
. . . all things—
George Gordon, Lord Byron, Excerpt from Don Juan.
. . . make common cause with . . .
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust.
. . . the devil himself . . .
William Shakespeare, As You Like It.
. . . as one would carry on a love affair.
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust.
And all for what?
Wilkie Collins, The Evil Genius.
—and all for an old man;
Edwin Arlington Robinson, The Three Taverns.
. . . for a great moment . . .
Peter Gay, Freud: A Life for Our Time quoting Sigmund Freud, Letter to His Fiancée.
—one moment . . .
K.R. Eissler, Talent and Genius: The Fictitious Case of Tausk Contra Freud.
. . . with such a person . . .
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust.
. . . as Wagner
Friedrich Nietzsche, The Case of Wagner.
But then, . . .
Emile Zola, The Debacle.
. . . Wagner’s disciples . . .
Friedrich Nietzsche, The Case of Wagner.
. . . whether Jew or gentile . . .
Peter Gay, Freud, Jews, and Other Germans.
. . . were all . . .
Wilkie Collins, The Evil Genius.
. . . like that, and remained like that, always.
Peter Gay, Freud: A Life for Our Time

_______________________________________________

This is the scene at the dinner party where Raben rushes to the library to talk to Levi.  Raben had told me he didn’t eat pork.  I asked him why.  He said, “I’m a member of the tribe.”  We came from a strange tribe, he and I !

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