The key to the mysteries of . . .
Leonard Shengold, Soul Murder: The Effects of Childhood Abuse and Deprivation.
. . . Parsifal . . .
Marcel Proust, Remembrance of Things Past.
. . . is found by and large in the mind of . . .
Leonard Shengold, Soul Murder: The Effects of Childhood Abuse and Deprivation.
. . . [t]he listener for whom . . .
Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams.
. . . the music . . .
Leonard Shengold, Soul Murder: The Effects of Childhood Abuse and Deprivation.
. . . represents a rejection of . . .
Paul Marcus, The Entrapment Defense.
. . . diatonic . . .
George Meredith, The Egoist.
. . . immutability, an aversion to definitiveness in musical phrases as long as they have not exhausted their potential for evolution and renewal.
Pierre Boulez on Parsifal, notes accompanying recording.
There are moments in Parsifal, alone among Wagner’s music dramas, during which I feel as if the composer allows one to look through the microscope, as it were, into the very DNA of music to see how it works.
Richard Busch, Parsifal: Musical DNA.
Narrative coherence is achieved . . .
Alwyn Berland, Light in August: A Study in Black and White.
. . . in Parsifal . . .
Lucy Beckett, Richard Wagner: Parsifal.
. . . by slow accretion, rather like a mosaic in which individual pieces have limited significance but which, when placed together, achieve an intelligible and beautiful form.
Alwyn Berland, Light in August: A Study in Black and White.

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